Words to Describe Your Characters: The SJs

neatly styled woman in a business meetingCPP Blog Central has posted a series on words associated with each MBTI personality type. If you’re an author, and you know your characters’ MBTI types, these articles are a great resource to generate ideas on how to describe them. Or, if you don’t know the character’s type, these lists might help you figure it out!

The SJ types (Guardians) share several characteristics in common, such as scheduled, organized, practical, and focused. For more specific descriptions of each type, check out each individual article:

The Personality Page type portraits also offer good descriptions. Are there any other words you would add to these lists?

Related posts:
ESFJ – ESTJ –  ISFJISTJ
Words to Describe Your Characters: The SPs
Words to Describe Your Characters: The NTs
Words to Describe Your Characters: The NFs
The Truth about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types

Image Copyright: samotrebizan / 123RF Stock Photo

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Words to Describe Your Characters: The SPs

woman playing and electric guitarCPP Blog Central has posted a series on words associated with each MBTI personality type. If you’re an author, and you know your characters’ MBTI types, these articles are a great resource to generate ideas on how to describe them. Or, if you don’t know the character’s type, these lists might help you figure it out!

The SP types (Artisans) share several characteristics in common, such as fun, resourceful, and present oriented. For more specific descriptions of each type, check out each individual article:

The Personality Page type portraits also offer good descriptions. Are there any other words you would add to these lists?

Related posts:

ESFP – ESTPISFP – ISTP

Words to Describe Your Characters: The NTs

man thinkingCPP Blog Central has posted a series on words associated with each MBTI personality type. If you’re an author, and you know your characters’ MBTI types, these articles are a great resource to generate ideas on how to describe them. Or, if you don’t know the character’s type, these lists might help you figure it out!

The NT types (Rationals) share several similar words, such as logical; driven or determined; and thought-provoking, innovative, or outside-the-box. For more specific descriptions for each type, check out each individual article:

Are there any words you would add to these lists to describe the types?

Related posts:
ENTJENTPINTJINTP

Words to Describe Your Characters: The NFs

woman reading a book on a park benchCPP Blog Central has posted a series on words associated with each MBTI personality type. If you’re an author, and you know your characters’ MBTI types, these articles are a great resource to generate ideas on how to describe them. Or, if you don’t know the character’s type, these lists might help you figure it out!

The NF types (Idealists) share several words in common, such as creative, compassionate, and caring. For more specific descriptions for each type, check out each individual article:

Are there any words you would add to these lists to describe the types?

Related posts:

ENFJENFPINFJINFP

Deep Characterization Using the Myers-Briggs Personality Types

RWA-WF logoWould you like to learn about using the Myers-Briggs personality types for creating fictional characters? I’m offering an online workshop November 30 – December 14, 2014. The workshop is offered through the Women’s Fiction chapter of the Romance Writers of America. It’s free for members and just $20 for nonmembers.

Workshop Description

While plot may keep an audience on the edge of their chairs, it’s the characters that make readers fall in love with a story. The better you know your characters, the more depth you can reveal, creating a bond with readers that lasts even after the book ends.

In this course, the instructor will challenge you to apply the principles of the Myers-Briggs personality types to deepen the character development in your work-in-progress (WIP). She will explain the four scales used by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI) to assess personality, and how those scales combine to form sixteen personality types.

For instance, is your character an introvert or extrovert? Is she a stickler for details, or does she prefer to look at the big picture? Does she consider logic or people first when making a decision? Does she like to plan out her day, or follow opportunities as they arise?

The instructor will show how you can apply knowledge of the sixteen personality types when developing characters: their strengths, their blind spots, and the potential for conflict with other types. Using a combination of theory and exercises, this fun and interactive class will give you yet another tool for bringing your characters to life.

Registration

Registration is through Eventbrite (https://rwa-wf-2014-12.eventbrite.com/). After you sign up, you’ll receive an invitation to the Yahoo Group where the class will be held. I hope you can join me!