New Release: Coronado Beach

Cover of Coronado Beach, showing a bridal bouquet abandoned on an empty beachI’m pleased to announce the release of my debut women’s fiction, Coronado Beach, available exclusively from Amazon.

In upcoming posts, I’ll show how I used the Myers-Briggs personality type theory to inform the character development and conflicts in this novel.

Here’s an example. From this excerpt, can you guess Karina’s personality type?

Monday morning, Karina gazed at a kitten crouching underneath a shiny black Mercedes in the parking garage at work. She was determined to save him, like the other strays she had rescued, whether he cooperated or not. It would only take a minute to feed him, even though it might make her late for work. Even though her boss had just lectured her on The Importance of Punctuality.

She was never late when it counted, like when she was due in court. But to a seasoned bureaucrat like Victoria, that didn’t matter. Rules were rules.

To Karina, rules kept people from finding a better way.

Her hand meandered toward a zip-top sandwich bag in the pocket of her business suit. “It’s okay, kitty. I brought you a snack.”

Squatting and balancing on three-inch designer pumps, she tossed a handful of kibble toward the suspicious feline. He watched her, green eyes glowing against golden fur, then turned away with regal aplomb. Amazing a starving two-pound kitten could cop that much attitude.

She gripped the car’s door handle to steady herself, then chucked the remaining cat food toward the kitten. She started to rise, but her foot slipped back and her stomach jumped. Her knee hit the concrete and sharp pain spread. Her cry echoed through the parking garage. The kitten scurried away.

Karina swore under her breath, not wanting to frighten the cat any more. Its life depended on her befriending it and getting it to a no-kill shelter before someone called Animal Control.

She stood and rubbed the sore spot on her knee. Her pantyhose were shredded, but a spare pair was tucked into her briefcase. Worse, her shoes were scuffed—or rather, Tara’s shoes, borrowed without permission. Seven hundred dollar Dior. No way Karina could afford to pay her back for them on a public defender’s salary. She squeezed her eyes shut, praying the mark would come out with toothpaste.

Here are some hints about Karina’s personality type:

  • Her commitment to rescuing stray cats, even when it could get her in trouble with her boss (thinking vs. feeling logic)
  • Her view of punctuality as being of relative rather than absolute importance (judgment vs. perception)
  • Her belief that following the rules keeps you from finding a better way (sensation vs. intuition)

In this passage, Karina demonstrates dominant extraverted intuition with auxiliary feeling, making her an ENFP. She’s not intended to be a “prototypical” ENFP—she’ll be the first to tell you she’s unique in the universe—but MBTI language helped me to bring certain characteristics to the forefront and contrast them with her boss to create tension.

Her habit of borrowing her sister’s shoes without permission? That’s not personality type. That’s Karina, and it’s symptomatic of a deeper dynamic between the sisters. Personality type isn’t everything. It’s just a tool, and one I find particularly useful.

So, how did you do? Were you able to guess Karina’s personality type, or come close? Leave a comment to let me know how you did!


Coronado Beach, now available from Amazon and free with Kindle Unlimited

Karina’s faith in love has been shaken by the breakup of her sister’s fairytale marriage. After a year away, her wealthy ex-brother-in-law, Alex, takes a job alongside her at the San Diego public defender’s office. When a dangerous client assaults Karina, Alex subdues him, and Karina finds comfort in Alex’s kiss. She fights the attraction, knowing an entanglement with him could destroy her relationship with her sister. She won’t find the right man if she keeps falling for the wrong ones, and she can’t heal her family until she heals her own heart.

Words to Describe Your Characters: The SJs

neatly styled woman in a business meetingCPP Blog Central has posted a series on words associated with each MBTI personality type. If you’re an author, and you know your characters’ MBTI types, these articles are a great resource to generate ideas on how to describe them. Or, if you don’t know the character’s type, these lists might help you figure it out!

The SJ types (Guardians) share several characteristics in common, such as scheduled, organized, practical, and focused. For more specific descriptions of each type, check out each individual article:

The Personality Page type portraits also offer good descriptions. Are there any other words you would add to these lists?

Related posts:
ESFJ – ESTJ –  ISFJISTJ
Words to Describe Your Characters: The SPs
Words to Describe Your Characters: The NTs
Words to Describe Your Characters: The NFs
The Truth about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types

Image Copyright: samotrebizan / 123RF Stock Photo

Words to Describe Your Characters: The SPs

woman playing and electric guitarCPP Blog Central has posted a series on words associated with each MBTI personality type. If you’re an author, and you know your characters’ MBTI types, these articles are a great resource to generate ideas on how to describe them. Or, if you don’t know the character’s type, these lists might help you figure it out!

The SP types (Artisans) share several characteristics in common, such as fun, resourceful, and present oriented. For more specific descriptions of each type, check out each individual article:

The Personality Page type portraits also offer good descriptions. Are there any other words you would add to these lists?

Related posts:

ESFP – ESTPISFP – ISTP

Words to Describe Your Characters: The NTs

man thinkingCPP Blog Central has posted a series on words associated with each MBTI personality type. If you’re an author, and you know your characters’ MBTI types, these articles are a great resource to generate ideas on how to describe them. Or, if you don’t know the character’s type, these lists might help you figure it out!

The NT types (Rationals) share several similar words, such as logical; driven or determined; and thought-provoking, innovative, or outside-the-box. For more specific descriptions for each type, check out each individual article:

Are there any words you would add to these lists to describe the types?

Related posts:
ENTJENTPINTJINTP

Words to Describe Your Characters: The NFs

woman reading a book on a park benchCPP Blog Central has posted a series on words associated with each MBTI personality type. If you’re an author, and you know your characters’ MBTI types, these articles are a great resource to generate ideas on how to describe them. Or, if you don’t know the character’s type, these lists might help you figure it out!

The NF types (Idealists) share several words in common, such as creative, compassionate, and caring. For more specific descriptions for each type, check out each individual article:

Are there any words you would add to these lists to describe the types?

Related posts:

ENFJENFPINFJINFP

Deep Characterization Using the Myers-Briggs Personality Types

RWA-WF logoWould you like to learn about using the Myers-Briggs personality types for creating fictional characters? I’m offering an online workshop November 30 – December 14, 2014. The workshop is offered through the Women’s Fiction chapter of the Romance Writers of America. It’s free for members and just $20 for nonmembers.

Workshop Description

While plot may keep an audience on the edge of their chairs, it’s the characters that make readers fall in love with a story. The better you know your characters, the more depth you can reveal, creating a bond with readers that lasts even after the book ends.

In this course, the instructor will challenge you to apply the principles of the Myers-Briggs personality types to deepen the character development in your work-in-progress (WIP). She will explain the four scales used by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI) to assess personality, and how those scales combine to form sixteen personality types.

For instance, is your character an introvert or extrovert? Is she a stickler for details, or does she prefer to look at the big picture? Does she consider logic or people first when making a decision? Does she like to plan out her day, or follow opportunities as they arise?

The instructor will show how you can apply knowledge of the sixteen personality types when developing characters: their strengths, their blind spots, and the potential for conflict with other types. Using a combination of theory and exercises, this fun and interactive class will give you yet another tool for bringing your characters to life.

Registration

Registration is through Eventbrite (https://rwa-wf-2014-12.eventbrite.com/). After you sign up, you’ll receive an invitation to the Yahoo Group where the class will be held. I hope you can join me!

Words | Dunning Personality Type Experts

INFPs have a special relationship with words. INFPs focus not only on the meaning of words but also the feelings they create. In this blog post, Paul Dunning explains his love for words. — A.J.W.

INFP Reflections

By Paul Dunning

After reading Tolkien’s quote – “I often long to work at my nonsense fairy language and don’t let myself ’cause though I love it so it does seem such a mad hobby!” – in my previous blog, I started to wonder if other INFPs have the same affiliation with words.

From an early age I have thought about their genesis, speculating that a word like “ugly” came about because it is a natural verbal response to something unpleasant to see.

Words can be a lot of fun. It seems Tolkien loved the creativity of word play. As an INFP, one of my fascinations is with the feelings certain words emote when spoken that go beyond their intended meaning.

“Cantankerous” jumps out at you, laden with emphasis, each syllable a heavy footstep on the floor.

“Theme” seems to stick to the roof of your mouth, like a spoonful of verbal peanut butter.

“Auspicious” sounds as if it can’t contain its meaning, spilling hope in all directions.

This may not be an INFP thing at all, but I wonder. Our dominant function of Introverted Feeling focuses us on inwardly evaluating ideas according to our values. And words are ideas, so by playing with words we refine our tools to communicate. And that can be fun.

What is your relationship with words?

via Words | Dunning Personality Type Experts.