Navigating Your Blind Spots, Part 3: Introverts

In my last post, I discussed how the natural blind spots of extraverts can create conflict on teams. Here, I explore the blind spots of introverts based on the dominant function of their Myers-Briggs personality type.

Introverted thinking (INTP/ISTP) values knowledge. Dominant introverted thinking expects people to focus on objective data when making decisions. It views personal considerations as illogical and unpredictable, and therefore not a sound basis for reaching conclusions.

Introverted thinking types naturally assume
that logic-based insights can stand on their own, requiring no explanation or defense. By looking beyond this assumption, Continue reading “Navigating Your Blind Spots, Part 3: Introverts”

Navigating Your Blind Spots, Part 2: Extraverts

In my last post, I wrote about how the natural blind spots of different personality types can create conflict on teams. Here, I explore the blind spots of extraverts based on the dominant function of their Myers-Briggs personality type.

Extraverted thinking (ENTJ/ESTJ) values logic. Dominant extraverted thinking expects people to act and make decisions based on objective data. It views personal considerations as biased, and therefore doesn’t trust them.

Extraverted thinking types naturally assume
Continue reading “Navigating Your Blind Spots, Part 2: Extraverts”

Navigating Your Blind Spots, Part 1: Team Building

How do you introduce the concept of personality type to a group that’s resistant?

I was asked that question when I spoke about Building Effective Teams Using the Myers-Briggs Personality Types at the Technical Communication Summit ’10 in Dallas, TX. An audience member asked whether focusing on blind spots would be a good place to start.

Blind spots are assumptions so deeply ingrained in our personalities that we’re unaware they exist. They can make us less effective and even generate conflict on work teams. So how do we overcome something when we don’t know it exists?
Continue reading “Navigating Your Blind Spots, Part 1: Team Building”